The Importance Of Wine In The Dubrovnik Republic

FOR GOOD HEALTH AND LONGEVITY

In the Dubrovnik Republic times, wine was one of the most important things needed for a mortal soul. A regular medical prescriptions always included a glass of wine two times a day (for breakfast and dinner), for good health and longevity.

It was common to serve bread soaked in wine for children over 2 years old (after a breastfeeding period), because in that way they would not get drunk, while older children drank wine mixed with water.

In the Dubrovnik Republic, wine was food. The wine production was strictly controlled. Every family could plant up to 100 grape vines, not more. That number was considered sufficient for the domestic use.

The government supervised vineyards. In the first written Statutes of Dubrovnik from 1272, there is the provision saying that every vineyard had to be tilled twice a year. If it was situated on a slopes over the sea, then it had to be tilled 3 times a year. Those who would neglect their vineyards were imprisoned for 18 days.

The Harvest Time Meant The Holiday Time

Wine producers were paying taxes for production of Dubrovnik Wine.
How important that production was, says the fact that the Rector himself would proclaim the beginning of the grape harvest. Usually the harvest would start at the end of August, and the harvest time was the holiday time, even sessions of government were not organized during the harvest season.

Wine sales were allowed just in taverns and in the 15th century there were more than 130 taverns in the city. The government inspected the quality of the Dubrovnik wine sold there regularly.

The import of foreign wines was strictly forbidden. In rare occasions, like when natural disasters destroyed the grapes, the government would allow an import of foreign wine, mostly from Italy.

In the Republic of Dubrovnik, mostly white grapes were planted and white wine was favored. The last grape vine sort that remained from that time is Dubrovnik Malvasija. It can still be found in the Konavle region, the eastern part of the Dubrovnik territory, where dry white wine and sweet desert wine are produced, made from the grapes of Malvasija. Let me take you to the excursion to Konavle, and we’ll taste the awarded Dubrovačka Malvasija wine. 

According to some historical data, the average annual consummation of wine in the city was around 500 liters per person in the 15th century.

It was common to serve bread soaked in wine for children over 2 years old (after a breastfeeding period), because in that way they would not get drunk, while older children drank wine mixed with water.

The Importance Of Wine In The Dubrovnik Republic

FOR GOOD HEALTH AND LONGEVITY

In the Dubrovnik Republic times, wine was one of the most important things needed for a mortal soul. A regular medical prescriptions always included a glass of wine two times a day (for breakfast and dinner), for good health and longevity.

It was common to serve bread soaked in wine for children over 2 years old (after a breastfeeding period), because in that way they would not get drunk, while older children drank wine mixed with water.

In the Dubrovnik Republic, wine was food. The wine production was strictly controlled. Every family could plant up to 100 grape vines, not more. That number was considered sufficient for the domestic use.

The government supervised vineyards. In the first written Statutes of Dubrovnik from 1272, there is the provision saying that every vineyard had to be tilled twice a year. If it was situated on a slopes over the sea, then it had to be tilled 3 times a year. Those who would neglect their vineyards were imprisoned for 18 days.

The Harvest Time Meant The Holiday Time

Wine producers were paying taxes for production of Dubrovnik Wine.
How important that production was, says the fact that the Rector himself would proclaim the beginning of the grape harvest. Usually the harvest would start at the end of August, and the harvest time was the holiday time, even sessions of government were not organized during the harvest season.

Wine sales were allowed just in taverns and in the 15th century there were more than 130 taverns in the city. The government inspected the quality of the Dubrovnik wine sold there regularly.

The import of foreign wines was strictly forbidden. In rare occasions, like when natural disasters destroyed the grapes, the government would allow an import of foreign wine, mostly from Italy.

In the Republic of Dubrovnik, mostly white grapes were planted and white wine was favored. The last grape vine sort that remained from that time is Dubrovnik Malvasija. It can still be found in the Konavle region, the eastern part of the Dubrovnik territory, where dry white wine and sweet desert wine are produced, made from the grapes of Malvasija. Let me take you to the excursion to Konavle, and we’ll taste the awarded Dubrovačka Malvasija wine. 

According to some historical data, the average annual consummation of wine in the city was around 500 liters per person in the 15th century.

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