Croatian Currency – Kuna

Two furs for one ox

Kuna means a Pine (North European) marten, an animal related to wolverines, minks, badgers or weasels. Martens are small animals (up to 21 inches in length) with long bushy tails (a tail makes the half of the marten’s length) and large paws with retractable claws. The fur varies from yellowish to dark brown, depending on the species, and is valued by trappers.

They are omnivorous animals. They eat squirrels, mice, rabbits, birds, fish, insects, and eggs, but also fruit and nuts.

In the middle ages, marten pelts were highly valued goods used as a trading currency in the Croatian Kingdom. The “banovac”, a Croatian coin struck and used between 1235 and 1384, included the image of marten. In the Croatian language, the marten is called kuna, and the modern Croatian currency was named in a tribute of the ancient trading currency and its significance.

CROATIAN NATIONAL FLOWER – IRIS

Iris (or Perunika) is the Croatian national flower. In Christianity, it is a symbol of the pain and sorrow of Mary, the Mother of God. The iris name comes from the ancient Greek’s goddess of rainbow, a messenger of the gods, Iris.

The goddess Iris painted messages sent from the heights to the Earth with a rainbow. Wherever the rainbow touched the ground, an iris flower had raised.

The Croatian word for iris is perunika. In Slavic mythology, Perun was the name of the supreme god, who was the god of thunder and lightning. Wherever his lightning struck the ground, a flower perunika/ iris had raised.

THE SAINT PATRON OF CROATIA

In 1687, the Croatian Parliament chose St. Joseph for the heavenly protector of the Croatian Kingdom and the Croatian people. A written decision in Latin says: “Saint Joseph, the faithful foster of the Christ Savior and the virgin fiancé of the Virgin Madonna was unanimously elected by the Croatian Parliament for the special protector of the Kingdom of Croatia.”

St. Joseph’s Day is the March, 19th. On the Pelješac Peninsula, the oyster festival is celebrated on that day, because at the end of March and the beginning of the April oysters are the fullest.

Regardless of the time of your visit join me on the Pelješac peninsula excursion and we’ll taste them fresh, directly from the sea. I will share with you more tales about Croatian currency and other interesting topics.

The sketch of Dubrovnik Old Town and famous poet Ivan Gundulić portrayed on 50 kuna bill

Croatian Currency – Kuna

Two furs for one ox

Kuna means a Pine (North European) marten, an animal related to wolverines, minks, badgers or weasels. Martens are small animals (up to 21 inches in length) with long bushy tails (a tail makes the half of the marten’s length) and large paws with retractable claws. The fur varies from yellowish to dark brown, depending on the species, and is valued by trappers.

They are omnivorous animals. They eat squirrels, mice, rabbits, birds, fish, insects, and eggs, but also fruit and nuts.

In the middle ages, marten pelts were highly valued goods used as a trading currency in the Croatian Kingdom. The “banovac”, a Croatian coin struck and used between 1235 and 1384, included the image of marten. In the Croatian language, the marten is called kuna, and the modern Croatian currency was named in a tribute of the ancient trading currency and its significance.

CROATIAN NATIONAL FLOWER – IRIS

Iris (or Perunika) is the Croatian national flower. In Christianity, it is a symbol of the pain and sorrow of Mary, the Mother of God. The iris name comes from the ancient Greek’s goddess of rainbow, a messenger of the gods, Iris.

The goddess Iris painted messages sent from the heights to the Earth with a rainbow. Wherever the rainbow touched the ground, an iris flower had raised.

The Croatian word for iris is perunika. In Slavic mythology, Perun was the name of the supreme god, who was the god of thunder and lightning. Wherever his lightning struck the ground, a flower perunika/ iris had raised.

THE SAINT PATRON OF CROATIA

In 1687, the Croatian Parliament chose St. Joseph for the heavenly protector of the Croatian Kingdom and the Croatian people. A written decision in Latin says: “Saint Joseph, the faithful foster of the Christ Savior and the virgin fiancé of the Virgin Madonna was unanimously elected by the Croatian Parliament for the special protector of the Kingdom of Croatia.”

St. Joseph’s Day is the March, 19th. On the Pelješac Peninsula, the oyster festival is celebrated on that day, because at the end of March and the beginning of the April oysters are the fullest.

Regardless of the time of your visit join me on the Pelješac peninsula excursion and we’ll taste them fresh, directly from the sea. I will share with you more tales about Croatian currency and other interesting topics.

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