Religions In The Cosmopolitan Dubrovnik

Everyone was welcome

Dubrovnik has survived for centuries on the border of Roman Catholicism, Orthodox Christianity, and Islam. People from different European cities were regular visitors, bringing their traditions, religions, and customs. According to the preserved records and letters, newcomers always felt welcome, regardless of differences in language, appearance, or religion.

Dubrovnik has always nurtured a good-natured attitude towards foreigners, respecting diversity, and facilitating coexistence.

In the past, Dubrovnik was a very rigorous Roman Catholic place, where just Roman Catholics could reside. Just Roman Catholics could be citizens of Dubrovnik. The only exceptions were Jews, who started to live inside the City Walls from 1324. The first mention of the synagogue is from 1408, but the Sephardic Synagogue that still exists (still in service) was opened at the beginning of the 16th century. It’s considered one of the oldest existing active synagogues in Europe. Today, the Jewish community in Dubrovnik is small, and there are no regular services in the temple, just on high holidays, on special occasions or requests.

THE POLICY CHANGED, BUT THE ATTITUDE REMAINED THE SAME

Napoleon’s troops occupied Dubrovnik in 1806. The new foreign government allowed members of other religions to settle in the city, for the first time in its long history.

By the end of that century, the number of Orthodox residents of the city increased. The need to build an Orthodox church inside the walls arose. Finally, in 1877, the Serbian Orthodox Church of the Holy Annunciation was erected. Today, there are regular services at this church for about 1300 citizens of Dubrovnik, who declare themselves Orthodox Christians.

At the beginning of the 20th century, The Islamic Masjid, a mosque, was opened in the Old City of Dubrovnik. It’s a little bit different than an ordinary mosque, due to lack of minaret (a tall, slender tower with balconies, used for calling the faithful to prayer). About 1500 local Muslims still gather there to pray regularly.

Still, Dubrovnik is predominantly a Roman Catholic place, and 90% of the city’s population (of 43,000 people) declare themselves Roman Catholics.

Today, within the Walls, besides mentioned mosque, Orthodox church, and Synagogue, you’ll still find over 20 Roman Catholic churches and chapels (not all of them in service), two active monasteries (Franciscan and Dominican monastery), and one nunnery (The Od Sigurate Convent).

Join me on my Jewish heritage tour and learn more about the life of Jews in Dubrovnik. Also, if you would like to expand your knowledge about the Jewish confession and community on Balkan with a 5 days excursion, I would be delighted to take you on my Jewish Heritage Tour in Croatia and Bosnia & Herzegovina.

Religions In The Cosmopolitan Dubrovnik

Religions In The Cosmopolitan Dubrovnik

Everyone was welcome

Dubrovnik has survived for centuries on the border of Roman Catholicism, Orthodox Christianity, and Islam. People from different European cities were regular visitors, bringing their traditions, religions, and customs. According to the preserved records and letters, newcomers always felt welcome, regardless of differences in language, appearance, or religion.

Dubrovnik has always nurtured a good-natured attitude towards foreigners, respecting diversity, and facilitating coexistence.

In the past, Dubrovnik was a very rigorous Roman Catholic place, where just Roman Catholics could reside. Just Roman Catholics could be citizens of Dubrovnik. The only exceptions were Jews, who started to live inside the City Walls from 1324. The first mention of the synagogue is from 1408, but the Sephardic Synagogue that still exists (still in service) was opened at the beginning of the 16th century. It’s considered one of the oldest existing active synagogues in Europe. Today, the Jewish community in Dubrovnik is small, and there are no regular services in the temple, just on high holidays, on special occasions or requests.

Religions In The Cosmopolitan Dubrovnik

THE POLICY CHANGED, BUT THE ATTITUDE REMAINED THE SAME

Napoleon’s troops occupied Dubrovnik in 1806. The new foreign government allowed members of other religions to settle in the city, for the first time in its long history.

By the end of that century, the number of Orthodox residents of the city increased. The need to build an Orthodox church inside the walls arose. Finally, in 1877, the Serbian Orthodox Church of the Holy Annunciation was erected. Today, there are regular services at this church for about 1300 citizens of Dubrovnik, who declare themselves Orthodox Christians.

At the beginning of the 20th century, The Islamic Masjid, a mosque, was opened in the Old City of Dubrovnik. It’s a little bit different than an ordinary mosque, due to lack of minaret (a tall, slender tower with balconies, used for calling the faithful to prayer). About 1500 local Muslims still gather there to pray regularly.

Still, Dubrovnik is predominantly a Roman Catholic place, and 90% of the city’s population (of 43,000 people) declare themselves Roman Catholics.

Today, within the Walls, besides mentioned mosque, Orthodox church, and Synagogue, you’ll still find over 20 Roman Catholic churches and chapels (not all of them in service), two active monasteries (Franciscan and Dominican monastery), and one nunnery (The Od Sigurate Convent).

Join me on my Jewish heritage tour and learn more about the life of Jews in Dubrovnik. Also, if you would like to expand your knowledge about the Jewish confession and community on Balkan with a 5 days excursion, I would be delighted to take you on my Jewish Heritage Tour in Croatia and Bosnia & Herzegovina.

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